ATTN: SAN FRANCISCO WRITERS

katiecoyle:

I belong to a truly wonderful writing group that meets every Tuesday evening in the Mission, in homes or bars, to workshop fiction or non-fiction or poetry or whatever it is you’re working on, but also just to drink wine and discuss the books we’re reading and, often, for long intervals, television. We are seeking one to two new members to join our ranks. Does this sound like the sort of thing that would interest you? If so, message me!

xoxo,

Katie

This is my writing group, too, and everything Katie says is true! Wanna join?

29pco:

We’re excited to introduce Scratch — a new magazine about reading, writing, and the business of publishing. Download the app or sign up on the website to read the first subscriber issue, ”Hunger”. 
"Hunger," is filled with interviews, features, and personal stories about the economics of being a writer. In an interview with Susan Orlean, she reflects on freelancing, earning money, and why being a writer is like running a small business.

The world we live in now is much more about individuals. Especially for writers—ugh, can we think of another word than brand? But the fact is, it is the right word. You create a professional persona that can be applied in many different ways, some of which you don’t get paid for, like Twitter, and some of which then lead to other interesting work that you maybe didn’t even predict. — Susan Orlean

In a personal essay, Rachael Maddux critiques the common advice that writers “stay hungry”.

“‘Stay hungry,’ as it happens, is terrible advice. Taken literally, it suggests welcoming the symptoms of starvation: fatigue, anxiety, depression, muscle atrophy, stunted growth, compromised immune response, death.” — Rachael Maddux

In line with their commitment to information, at the end of each issue is a Transparency Index, revealing the relationships and finances behind the making of Scratch.

29pco:

We’re excited to introduce Scratch — a new magazine about reading, writing, and the business of publishing. Download the app or sign up on the website to read the first subscriber issue, ”Hunger”. 

"Hunger," is filled with interviews, features, and personal stories about the economics of being a writer. In an interview with Susan Orlean, she reflects on freelancing, earning money, and why being a writer is like running a small business.

The world we live in now is much more about individuals. Especially for writers—ugh, can we think of another word than brand? But the fact is, it is the right word. You create a professional persona that can be applied in many different ways, some of which you don’t get paid for, like Twitter, and some of which then lead to other interesting work that you maybe didn’t even predict.
— Susan Orlean

In a personal essay, Rachael Maddux critiques the common advice that writers “stay hungry”.

“‘Stay hungry,’ as it happens, is terrible advice. Taken literally, it suggests welcoming the symptoms of starvation: fatigue, anxiety, depression, muscle atrophy, stunted growth, compromised immune response, death.”
— Rachael Maddux

In line with their commitment to information, at the end of each issue is a Transparency Index, revealing the relationships and finances behind the making of Scratch.

I wrote this for Scratch, and you can now read it for free on The Billfold.

theniftyfifties:

Jean Seberg in Bonjour Tristesse, 1957.

theniftyfifties:

Jean Seberg in Bonjour Tristesse, 1957.

(Source: jessiccachastain)

katiecoyle:

strong female characters, detectives, talking animals, time travel sequences, romantic scenes that feel like fan fiction, jokes, loving and supportive parents, intricate plots at the expense of nuanced characters, needlessly long descriptions of food, movies that Jennifer Ehle can star in, things…

movies that Jennifer Ehle can star in

Imagine the Angels of Bread

This is the year that squatters evict landlords,
gazing like admirals from the rail
of the roofdeck
or levitating hands in praise
of steam in the shower;
this is the year
that shawled refugees deport judges
who stare at the floor
and their swollen feet
as files are stamped
with their destination;
this is the year that police revolvers,
stove-hot, blister the fingers
of raging cops,
and nightsticks splinter
in their palms;
this is the year
that darkskinned men
lynched a century ago
return to sip coffee quietly
with the apologizing descendants
of their executioners.

This is the year that those
who swim the border’s undertow
and shiver in boxcars
are greeted with trumpets and drums
at the first railroad crossing
on the other side;
this is the year that the hands
pulling tomatoes from the vine
uproot the deed to the earth that sprouts the vine,
the hands canning tomatoes
are named in the will
that owns the bedlam of the cannery;
this is the year that the eyes
stinging from the poison that purifies toilets
awaken at last to the sight
of a rooster-loud hillside,
pilgrimage of immigrant birth;
this is the year that cockroaches
become extinct, that no doctor
finds a roach embedded
in the ear of an infant;
this is the year that the food stamps
of adolescent mothers
are auctioned like gold doubloons,
and no coin is given to buy machetes
for the next bouquet of severed heads
in coffee plantation country.

If the abolition of slave-manacles
began as a vision of hands without manacles,
then this is the year;
if the shutdown of extermination camps
began as imagination of a land
without barbed wire or the crematorium,
then this is the year;
if every rebellion begins with the idea
that conquerors on horseback
are not many-legged gods, that they too drown
if plunged in the river,
then this is the year.

So may every humiliated mouth,
teeth like desecrated headstones,
fill with the angels of bread.

—Martín Espada

_________________

Happy new year,  y’all.

Mallory is on fire this week, and it’s only Monday.

Tags: The Toast

thechanelmuse:

Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen by Moneta Sleet, Jr.

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)